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MOLON LABE - "COME AND TAKE IT" - PATCH

$5.99
  • MOLON LABE - "COME AND TAKE IT" - PATCH
MOLON LABE - MOLON LABE -

SANDBOX STORE

MOLON LABE - "COME AND TAKE IT" - PATCH

$5.99

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Description

MOLON LABE

 "Come and take it" is a historic slogan, first used in the Battle of Thermopylae as "Molon labe", and later in 1778 at Fort Morris in the Province of Georgia during the American Revolutionary War, and in 1835 at the Battle of Gonzales during the Texas Revolution.
A contingent of British soldiers attempted to take the fort on November 25, 1778. The American contingent at Fort Morris was led by Colonel John McIntosh (c. 1748-1826).  The Americans numbered only 127 Continental soldiers plus militiamen and local citizens. The fort itself was crudely constructed and could not have withstood any concerted attack.
The British commander, Colonel Fuser, demanded Fort Morris' surrender through a written note to the American rebels. Though clearly outnumbered (he had only about 200 men plus artillery), Colonel McIntosh's defiant written response to the British demand included the following line: "As to surrendering the fort, receive this laconic reply: COME AND TAKE IT!".
The British declined to attack, in large part due to their lack of intelligence regarding other forces in the area. Colonel Fuser believed a recent skirmish in the area, combined with Colonel McIntosh's bravado, might have reflected reinforcements and so the British withdrew.